Tips for Better Study Skills

“Be sure to study for the test on Friday,” one of your child’s teachers is certain to say some day soon. Does your child know how?

While many teachers spend some class time teaching study skills, it’s not unusual for students to need more guidance than they get in the classroom. In middle school, there’s more homework, it becomes more difficult and it requires analytical skills your child may not have developed yet.

The study skills your child needs to do well on her test on Friday are the same ones she will need to succeed in high school and college: getting organized, taking good notes and studying effectively. As your child moves toward independence, she’s less likely to ask for your advice. She will need to go through some trial and error to come up with the strategies most compatible with her learning style. And you’ll want to encourage her to take responsibility for her own school work.

You can help her by monitoring homework, asking questions and helping her evaluate what works for her – and what doesn’t. Helping Your Child Get Organized Getting organized is crucial for your child, says Linda Winburn, a veteran South Carolina middle school teacher who became the state’s 2005 Teacher of the Year. “And the key is parent involvement.”

Some tips to help your child get organized:

Provide a place to study. It doesn’t have to be a desk, says Winburn. “A kitchen counter is a great place, especially if mom’s in the kitchen cooking.” The desk or table surface should be big enough so that your student can spread out papers and books. Make sure essential supplies such as pens, paper and calculator are close by. Have good lighting and a sturdy chair that’s the right height available.  Worthington Direct, www.worthingtondirect.com, offers many different styles and heights to keep your child comfortable during study time.  continue reading

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