Classroom Furniture

Teacher Organization Makes Teaching a Breeze

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The average day for a teacher is far from ordinary and can get pretty hectic. Although there is no recipe to eliminate the chaos completely, there are ways to alleviate it. Everything runs better with a little organization. When teachers are organized, and help their students be organized, the day will always go much smoother. Teacher organization systems that are flexible and require little floor space are a good way to make that happen.

Teacher Organization

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Study Carrels Return in an Age of Distraction

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Study carrels have a long history when you consider they go back to 13th century London and Westminster Abbey. Study CarrelWith Encyclopedia Britannica telling us they went back even further in cathedrals of the era, you can see the original purpose of the carrel. Back then, they were meant for serious religious study, which denotes that even in the 13th century, distractions were possible.

Today, distractions are everywhere, especially in schools. When a student needs to concentrate on a project, many classrooms have collaborative setups as a way to use distractions as a benefit. But when it comes to learning on a computer, a student may have to work on his or own. With so much demand on our new generation to learn new technology, a study carrel may be necessary in every classroom to sort through the perplexity.

Just what makes a perfect study carrel?

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Classroom Cleaning Tips

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Now that you have come back from your holiday break and the New Year is upon us, you might be feeling some mid-year doldrums. One easy way to liven the mood in your classroom is to rearrange, reorganize, and clean that classroom up. Here are some great tips for your mid-year classroom cleaning spree.

Dry Erase Board Cleaner

Dry Erase Board Cleaner

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The History of One-Room Schools

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One-room schools were commonplace throughout rural portions of various countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom and Ireland in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In most rural (country) and small town schools, all of the students met in a single room. There, a single teacher taught academic basics to five to eight grade levels of elementary-age boys and girls.

The quality of facilities at one-room schools varied with local economic conditions, but generally, the number of children at each grade level would vary with local populations. Most buildings were of simple frame construction, some with the school bell on a cupola. In Midwestern states, sod construction was also used, as well as stone in areas such as portions of the southwest where trees were scarce. In some locations, the schoolhouse was painted red, but most seem to have been white.

The blackboard really is a black board, made of wide boards painted black. It was not until much later that slate was used for chalkboards, although students often had individual slates for writing practice.

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