Classroom Furniture

Study Carrels Return in an Age of Distraction

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Study carrels have a long history when you consider they go back to 13th century London and Westminster Abbey. Study CarrelWith Encyclopedia Britannica telling us they went back even further in cathedrals of the era, you can see the original purpose of the carrel. Back then, they were meant for serious religious study, which denotes that even in the 13th century, distractions were possible.

Today, distractions are everywhere, especially in schools. When a student needs to concentrate on a project, many classrooms have collaborative setups as a way to use distractions as a benefit. But when it comes to learning on a computer, a student may have to work on his or own. With so much demand on our new generation to learn new technology, a study carrel may be necessary in every classroom to sort through the perplexity.

Just what makes a perfect study carrel?

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Classroom Cleaning Tips

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Now that you have come back from your holiday break and the New Year is upon us, you might be feeling some mid-year doldrums. One easy way to liven the mood in your classroom is to rearrange, reorganize, and clean that classroom up. Here are some great tips for your mid-year classroom cleaning spree.

Dry Erase Board Cleaner

Dry Erase Board Cleaner

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The History of One-Room Schools

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One-room schools were commonplace throughout rural portions of various countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom and Ireland in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In most rural (country) and small town schools, all of the students met in a single room. There, a single teacher taught academic basics to five to eight grade levels of elementary-age boys and girls.

The quality of facilities at one-room schools varied with local economic conditions, but generally, the number of children at each grade level would vary with local populations. Most buildings were of simple frame construction, some with the school bell on a cupola. In Midwestern states, sod construction was also used, as well as stone in areas such as portions of the southwest where trees were scarce. In some locations, the schoolhouse was painted red, but most seem to have been white.

The blackboard really is a black board, made of wide boards painted black. It was not until much later that slate was used for chalkboards, although students often had individual slates for writing practice.

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Classroom Furniture Color Theory

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When purchasing furniture to be used in schools and other educational settings, color can be an important factor to consider according to this recent article by Amee Meghani from Smith System.
Colorful Furnishings A Catalyst for School Success
By Amee Meghani
Product Engineer
While often ignored in the classroom, color remains an important element
to consider. Studies indicate that it plays a role in emotion, productivity,
communication and learning. According to Ohio-based interior
designer, Elizabeth Stout, color in school room design is rarely a
consideration.
“Furniture is usually chosen based on functionality,
ergonomics and durability,” Stout said. “Schools generally never choose
light colored furniture because it makes dirt easy to spot. Additionally, in some
elementary schools, chair color is dictated by size.”
Looking at the effects of color on emotion and relating that to the
purpose of the learning space can help guide the color choices – on walls, on
floors and even on furniture.
THE CLASSROOM
Because classrooms are used primarily for active learning, color in
this environment should maximize information retention and stimulate
participation. For that reason, it’s crucial to avoid over stimulation so avoid
large amounts of bright colors, especially reds and oranges. Rather, opt for
calming and neutral colors such as green and blue.
Furniture can liven up otherwise dull classrooms by supplying color. The
relatively small amount of color on furniture does not have the same
affect as bright colors on walls. So, select yellow furniture to elicit feelings
of liveliness, energy, happiness and excitement. Red and orange in small
quantities can also demand attention and attract learners’ attention to detail –
a great way to lead students to a certain part of the room for an engaging activity.
If the intent is to match all elements of the room, use furniture colors that are
similar to wall colors focusing on the calming greens and blues.
The one exception to color in the classroom occurs with younger children,
who unlike older children, thrive in a bright-colored environment. Bright
colors can be used on the walls and in the furniture. Color can also be used to
help children understand how certain areas of a room are used. For example,
the blue chairs in the corner may be used as a reading and relaxation area,
while the red table may be a free-play space.

 

LIBRARIES
Color in a library setting should be used to align emotions and behaviors
with the purpose of the space. Since different areas of a library are intended
for different activities, have fun experimenting with color. Take a reading
area, for example. As an extension of the learning environment, reading areas
are intended to be calming and relaxing allowing learners to reflect.
In this instance, matching calming wall colors – like greens and blues – with
furniture colors maximizes the effects of color in this space.
In contrast, if an area is used for lounging and conversing, color can
provide excitement. Consider using a more neutral wall color and
experimenting with furniture color by using bright-colored cushions, fixed
colors on lounging chairs or vibrant accents on tables or shelving. Color
selections might include deep reds, oranges and yellows, or pastels in any
color combination.
GIVE COLORFUL FURNITURE A TRY
In libraries and classrooms, it is clear that color can have an effect on mood,
emotion, and productivity, which ultimately influences student success.
Consider letting the purpose of the room guide the color scheme selection.
All of Smith System’s inspired colors are available online for purchase on many products; from book trucks and study carrels to computer tables and activity tables.

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